Springtime Flowers

Springtime Flowers

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It’s officially spring! Last week on the 21st it was the first official day of spring, although it has felt like spring since March 8th or so when it was 80 degrees for a few days. Watching the trees wake up from their winter naps is one of my favorite things, minus the allergies that come with them. The trees have buds on them and the dogwoods are starting to bloom or have already bloomed. The spring flowers are not far behind.

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Spring brings new life, fresh colors, fragrant smells, laughter and smiles to the world that was hiding from the clean look of fresh snow. With all of the love and joy that comes along with the sunny days, of course the cameras come out. The mornings are starting earlier and the nights are ending later, which means more time to snap away.

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The best times to photograph the new life of flowers and playing outside is in the early mornings as the sun is coming up or when the sun is going down in the evenings. These times are called the Golden Hour, because you won’t have to worry about long casting shadows on faces or across that pretty pink flower. Try shooting through a sandwich bag to get a hazy look on the edges of you flowers photos, getting in close for some macro photos, or free lens which I will be blogging about next time.

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Happy Spring and joyful shooting.

©TLM Productions, LLC

Magnifying the world

Magnifying the world

Venturing into new territory can be scary, even when it’s within something you know like the back of your hand. To me the little details in life mean everything, without them things would not be as they are. There’s a whole world that we don’t see living right under our noses, but we need some help seeing it.

Journey into the unseen world, shooting in macro during the last snow storm of February.

Journey into the unseen world, shooting in macro during the last snow storm of February.

Macro photography has always intrigued me, probably because it’s bringing a world that is so small to life. Photographer, Vyacheslav Mishchenko, has a whole series of snails shot in macro, I know it sounds funny but the photos are amazing. I started looking into ways that I could shoot in macro without spending a few hundred dollars on another lens. There are filters and rings to do reverse macro, this might seem crazy and it did to me too at first. I got a ring to shoot in reverse macro, which really just means that I take my lens off of my camera and turn it around, to mount it backwards. Makes sense right? A lens magnifies what we see so turning it around would do the opposite, brilliant!

Journey into the unseen world, shooting in macro during the last snow storm of February.

Journey into the unseen world, shooting in macro during the last snow storm of February.

Turns out, as brilliant as it was, I had to relearn how to shoot. Just turning the lens around proved to be harder than I thought, you loose the option to focus with the focus ring. You have to physically move closer or further way to get the right focus. You also need a lot of light, the aperture setting turns to ‘00.’ I used a handful of flashlights and some natural light in order to get my pictures. After a lot of trial and error, I finally was able to get some amazing photos of snowflakes during our last winter dusting.

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Now that it’s spring, I looking forward to practicing on the flowers in my garden to get the details in the petals and leaves. If you don’t have a ring or filter you can still practice shooting in macro, all you have to do is turn your lens around and shoot free lens reverse macro. It is more difficult but a great way to start practicing while you wait for your filter or ring to arrive.

Journey into the unseen world, shooting in macro during the last snow storm of February.

 

© TLM Productions, LLC